Volunteers

Meet some of the energetic volunteers working with us to connect and protect biodiversity corridors.
Kiarra

Kiarra

“Conservation projects like those carried out by Queensland Trust For Nature (QTFN), give hope for the future. When an animal species is lost in an environment, not only is that animal lost,

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relationships between that animal and others break down, ecosystems begin to crumble, regional biodiversity degrades, further species are lost and the environment in that area is forever changed. Losses like these are an example why conservation TODAY is so important so that future generations and wildlife don’t have to live with the consequences from our actions in today’s society.”

Geoff

Geoff

“As a wildlife photographer, I have always had a passion for wildlife and nature. Being in close proximity to wildlife and seeing them at their best, means conservation becomes a lot more personal.

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Volunteering for organisations like QTFN, whether in a photographic capacity or anything else, is payback for the debt of enjoying those astounding experiences. I believe that unless the special places are protected, actively looked after and, where necessary, rewilded, Australia will lose its special creatures and places. We will become like just so many other places where wild nature is becoming a memory that almost doesn’t exist anymore.”

Adam

Adam

‘I’ve loved volunteering with QTFN. Every day is a new adventure and contributes to real conservation achievements.
Whether conducting vegetation assessments, fauna tracking using motion sensing cameras, tree planting or

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helping out in the office, I felt my efforts greatly benefitted QTFN and their busy staff. ‘A highlight was visiting the uninhabited Avoid Island, not once but twice. Firstly for weed control and rubbish collection and secondly for a full week of sea turtle monitoring. These experiences I will never forget.’

Andy

Andy

Being an outdoor person, I have worked on several revegetation projects including two plantings at Ivory’s rock and one at Aroona. Always keen to help with tree planting to attract wildlife I get pleasure from watching the trees grow and then seeing them being used by wildlife for food and shelter.

Carla

Carla

Private land conservation is such a vital part of protecting nature and wildlife in Queensland, and making landholders more aware of the threats to nature and wildlife on private land, and what they can do to help is much needed.

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I have been helping QTFN with their social media, particularly in setting up their twitter, and their interest in raising awareness about conservation wildlife and nature on private land is a testament to their motivation to conserve Queensland’s unique biodiversity

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