Queensland Trust for Nature

Securing Queensland’s biodiversity for future generations

Queensland is Australia’s most biodiverse state with more plant and animal species than any other state or territory. 
 
With more than 85 percent of land in Queensland privately owned or managed, use and management of private land is critical to achieving sustainable environmental goals.
 
Queensland Trust for Nature (QTFN) is an independent not-for-profit organisation that works with private landholders as well as educators, business and government to develop and demonstrate scalable environmental projects on private land.
 
As well as working with landowners, QTFN owns and actively manages several properties, including a cattle station, a koala sanctuary and an island in the Southern Great Barrier Reef.

Our Work

Revolving Fund

Recycling dollars by purchasing, protecting and reselling land

Nature Refuges

Permanently safeguarding biodiversity on privately owned land

Offsets With Outcomes

Delivering offsets that support the enduring survival of koalas

Learning And Teaching

Growing passion and understanding of Queensland’s biodiversity

Partnering To Protect

Working together to create enduring biodiversity corridors

Our Team

Our Staff

Let us introduce our dedicated, talented and diverse team at QTFN

Our Directors

This experienced group drives our top-level strategic decisions

Funds Management Committee

Appointed by our Directors to advise on the administration of the Fund

Volunteers

Our energetic volunteers work with us to connect and protect biodiversity

Project Partners

Collaborations are key to the success of our hands-on conservation work

Business Partners

Support from businesses ensure we can continue our critical work

Education Partners

Growing passionate understanding of the importance of unique biodiversity

Our Places

Aroona

A working cattle station for over fifty years

Koala Crossing

Protecting an Aussie icon

Cassowary Connection

Cassowary corridor

For Sale

Buying protected land safeguards conservation

Other Projects

Everything we do at QTFN protects Queensland’s natural places

Southern Great Barrier Reef

Avoid Island: QTFN’s protected island

104,000 hectares of land preserved

56 unique ecosystems safeguarded

233 threatened species protected

Latest on Social Media

Queensland Trust for Nature added 2 new photos.
Queensland Trust for Nature
FNQ friends - keep an eye out for our Conservation Manager Tanya on the news tonight (Channel 7 and WIN News). We are celebrating QTFNs latest property acquisition in Smiths Gap, north of Tully.  The property purchased with Mission Beach’s C4 organisation, is part of a significant biodiversity and wildlife corridor for the endangered southern cassowary and many tropical rainforest plants and animals. #QTFN #habitatprotection

9 hours ago

FNQ friends - keep an eye out for our Conservation Manager Tanya on the news tonight (Channel 7 and WIN News). We are celebrating QTFNs latest property acquisition in Smiths Gap, north of Tully.

The property purchased with Mission Beach’s C4 organisation, is part of a significant biodiversity and wildlife corridor for the endangered southern cassowary and many tropical rainforest plants and animals. #QTFN #habitatprotection
... + Read More- Read Less

 

Comment on Facebook

TK Furner Barry Lyon

Olivia Paz

🙏❤️🙏❤️🙏❤️🙏❤️🙏❤️🙏❤️🙏🙏🙏❤️

Queensland Trust for Nature shared 7 News Cairns's post.
Queensland Trust for Nature

10 hours ago

The Spectacled flying-fox has been transferred from vulnerable to endangered this week under the EPBC Act. An extreme heatwave in far north Queensland in November 2018 is estimated to have killed more than 23,000 Spectacled flying-foxes, almost one third of the species in Australia. Let's hope recovery actions can be prioritised including increased support for wildlife carers who do such an important job.

7 News Cairns
The spectacled flying fox has been declared endangered, just months after record-breaking heat wiped out a third of the population. www.7plus.com.au/news #7News
... + Read More- Read Less

 

Comment on Facebook

We use to save these on the Atherton Tablelands whilst their parents were struck down and dying from paralysis ticks the babies would slowly starve to death and were often found on the forest floor riddled with lice and maggots. I am one of the lucky ones who helped my parents and others to save these gorgeous little critters and release them back to the wild ... back in the 1980s.

Not being mean but why are they protected? They spread diseases that kill and they smell horrendous. I heard they are protected because they help build rain forests... Townsville doesn't have rain forests and I doubt one will grow on my car bonnet as the paint peels off due to the acidic content of the faeces.

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