• Protect and restore koala habitat on Koala Crossing, our 652-hectare property that forms part of the Flinders-Karawatha Corridor, the largest remaining continuous stretch of open eucalypt forest in the region.
    • Own and manage Aroona Station, a working cattle property that also hosts thriving ecosystems which support koala populations.
    • Playing a leading role implementation of the habitat restoration component of the Queensland Government’s Koala Conservation Strategy – reversing the decline of koala populations in South East Queensland.
    • Harness efforts to restore a minimum of 250ha of koala habitat by 2024 using best-practice methodology catered to each site, and guarantee the longevity of these actions through provision for maintenance and legal protection.
    • Develop and deploy a mechanism for attracting, assessing, prioritising and funding koala habitat restoration activities.
    • Provide a standardised, scientifically rigorous and scalable monitoring framework for tracking achievements and how they benefit southeast Queensland’s koalas.
    • Partner with the Koala Ecology Group at The University of Queensland to lead koala research that will expand our knowledge of koala movement, foraging patterns, and disease incidence.
    Want to explore more

    Enquire about Camp Koala

    • Koalas in South East Queensland are under increasing pressure of urban encroachment. They need connected corridors to move, forage and breed, and their long-term survival requires protection at a landscape level.
    • At Koala Crossing, we have planted almost 100,000 koala food and shelter trees working with Greenfleet, corporate and community partners and volunteers.
    • Our research partnership with the University of Queensland’s Koala Ecology Group is providing vital information on the movements, health and habits of the koala population at Koala Crossing and in the Peak Crossing area.
    • Our extensive koala tagging, tracking and monitoring program has identified individual koalas roam across 20-100 hectares, and helped pinpoint areas for revegetation with their preferred Eucalyptus species Corymbia citriodora, Eucalyptus tereticornis and Eucalyptus crebra.
    • Since our acquisition of Koala Crossing in 2015, surveys indicate Koala Crossing’s koala population has increased in density, with the proportion of sites showing koala activity increasing from 75 per cent to 83 percent.

  • Action & Insight

    Nesting for neighbours

    As we increase the habitat for koalas at QTFN’s Koala Crossing, we are also creating habitat for a host of other native species. In 2020, with funding from the WIRES Landcare Wildlife Relief and Recovery Grants Program, we installed 40 nesting boxes and water drinking stations across the property. The nesting boxes, which were made […]

    Read more

    Measuring impact over the long-term

    QTFN’s trial roll out of the award-winning Accounting for Nature® Framework at Koala Crossing provided an initial Environmental Condition Index (EcondTM) score/s for the property in 2020. A score between 0 and 100 that describes the condition of the asset relative to its undegraded state, early estimates of the the Econd™ for Koala Crossing point […]

    Read more

    Surviving and thriving

    QTFN’s research partnership with the University of Queensland’s Koala Ecology Group is providing vital information on the movements, health and habits of the koala population at Koala Crossing. Data from Spot Assessment Technique (SAT) surveys conducted in 2015 and 2019 show Koala Crossing’s koala population has increased in density, with the proportion of sites with […]

    Read more

  • Protect and restore koala habitat on Koala Crossing, our 652-hectare property that forms part of the Flinders-Karawatha Corridor, the largest remaining continuous stretch of open eucalypt forest in the region.
  • Own and manage Aroona Station, a working cattle property that also hosts thriving ecosystems which support koala populations.
  • Playing a leading role implementation of the habitat restoration component of the Queensland Government’s Koala Conservation Strategy – reversing the decline of koala populations in South East Queensland.
  • Harness efforts to restore a minimum of 250ha of koala habitat by 2024 using best-practice methodology catered to each site, and guarantee the longevity of these actions through provision for maintenance and legal protection.
  • Develop and deploy a mechanism for attracting, assessing, prioritising and funding koala habitat restoration activities.
  • Provide a standardised, scientifically rigorous and scalable monitoring framework for tracking achievements and how they benefit southeast Queensland’s koalas.
  • Partner with the Koala Ecology Group at The University of Queensland to lead koala research that will expand our knowledge of koala movement, foraging patterns, and disease incidence.
Want to explore more

Enquire about Camp Koala

  • Koalas in South East Queensland are under increasing pressure of urban encroachment. They need connected corridors to move, forage and breed, and their long-term survival requires protection at a landscape level.
  • At Koala Crossing, we have planted almost 100,000 koala food and shelter trees working with Greenfleet, corporate and community partners and volunteers.
  • Our research partnership with the University of Queensland’s Koala Ecology Group is providing vital information on the movements, health and habits of the koala population at Koala Crossing and in the Peak Crossing area.
  • Our extensive koala tagging, tracking and monitoring program has identified individual koalas roam across 20-100 hectares, and helped pinpoint areas for revegetation with their preferred Eucalyptus species Corymbia citriodora, Eucalyptus tereticornis and Eucalyptus crebra.
  • Since our acquisition of Koala Crossing in 2015, surveys indicate Koala Crossing’s koala population has increased in density, with the proportion of sites showing koala activity increasing from 75 per cent to 83 percent.

Action & Insight

Nesting for neighbours

As we increase the habitat for koalas at QTFN’s Koala Crossing, we are also creating habitat for a host of other native species. In 2020, with funding from the WIRES Landcare Wildlife Relief and Recovery Grants Program, we installed 40 nesting boxes and water drinking stations across the property. The nesting boxes, which were made […]

Read more

Measuring impact over the long-term

QTFN’s trial roll out of the award-winning Accounting for Nature® Framework at Koala Crossing provided an initial Environmental Condition Index (EcondTM) score/s for the property in 2020. A score between 0 and 100 that describes the condition of the asset relative to its undegraded state, early estimates of the the Econd™ for Koala Crossing point […]

Read more

Surviving and thriving

QTFN’s research partnership with the University of Queensland’s Koala Ecology Group is providing vital information on the movements, health and habits of the koala population at Koala Crossing. Data from Spot Assessment Technique (SAT) surveys conducted in 2015 and 2019 show Koala Crossing’s koala population has increased in density, with the proportion of sites with […]

Read more